CICF NewsThanks for keeping up with what's going on.http://www.cicf.org/cicf-newsA Penny Saved<p>Dr. Bill Scott is a frugal man. The former Eli Lilly &amp; Company chemist and current <a href="http://science.iupui.edu/">Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) School of Science</a> research professor appreciates doing things in money-smart ways. He prefers walking or taking an IndyGo bus to get around town. That thrift also drives his interest in and ability to support a project that uses the intelligence and energy of college students to work towards disease treatments that might otherwise go undiscovered.</p><table width="250" border="0" align="right" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1"><tbody><tr><td><img src="/files/image/D3 image, courtesy of IUPUI caption - Left to right, Lindsey Fischer, former student researcher, William Scott, Ph_D_, Martin O'Donnell, Ph_D_, and Geno Samaritoni, graduate student, of the Distributed Drug Discovery (D3) program at IUPUI.jpg" width="308" height="205" alt="" /></td></tr><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><font class="blue "><small>Left to right, Lindsey Fischer, former student researcher, William Scott, Ph.D., Martin O'Donnell, Ph.D., and Geno Samaritoni, graduate student, of the Distributed Drug Discovery (D3) program at IUPUI in 2013. <br />Photo courtesy of IUPUI.</small></font></td></tr></tbody></table><p>Scott spent more than a quarter of a century at Lilly, researching possible drug treatments for the pharmaceutical giant. And, in that time, he saved his pennies, pennies he is now able to utilize, alongside additional funding from a variety of sources, to get college students engaged in hands-on research through his <a href="http://science.iupui.edu/news/pioneering-education-and-research-program-leads-international-conference-iupui">Distributed Drugs Discovery (D3) program</a>.<br /> <br />Drug companies can&rsquo;t make much profit on solutions to diseases that often ravage the lives of people in developing countries. But, thanks to Scott&rsquo;s innovative approach, D3 students at IUPUI &ndash; and in schools around the world &ndash; work and learn in research labs and, with a bit of luck, they might just synthesize a compound to cure malaria.<br /> <br />Because Dr. Scott has chosen to live modestly, even while working in a lucrative field, he is able to use his savings for D3, transforming fiscal wisdom into a passion project. Through his Distributed Drug Discovery Fund, a Personal Foundation of Central Indiana Community Foundation (CICF), Scott provides ongoing support to the D3 program. And, it&rsquo;s little surprise that he first connected with CICF on a form of public transportation &ndash; Amtrak.<br /> <br />That connection led to the creation of the Distributed Drug Discovery Fund, and the video included here.</p><p><iframe width="740" height="416" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/DgSYe5-hn4w" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe><br /> <br />To learn more about Dr. Scott&rsquo;s fund or to create your own Personal Foundation &ndash; the easy, low-cost alternative to private foundations &ndash; please contact Rob MacPherson at 317.634.2423, ext. 509, or <a href="javascript:void(location.href='mailto:'+String.fromCharCode(114,111,98,109,64,99,105,99,102,46,111,114,103)+'?subject=A%20Penny%20Saved%20-%20Personal%20Foundations%20at%20CICF')">robm@cicf.org</a>.</p><hr /><p>Read <a href="http://www.cicf.org/cicf-news/category/donor-story">more stories</a> about how people use CICF's Personal Foundations to use their passions as fuel for positive change.</p>http://www.cicf.org/cicf-news/2014/july/a-penny-savedWed, 23 Aug 3200 14:05:48 -0500Phase II Applications for Community Crime Prevention Grants Now Available<p><span style="font-size: 13px;">In partnership with the City of Indianapolis, The Indianapolis Foundation has announced that grant applications for Phase II of the 2014 Community Crime Prevention Grant program are now available online at www.cicf.org as of July 1, 2014. Organizations interested in applying are encouraged to review the grant criteria, procedures and reporting requirements for their program eligibility. The deadline to apply for Phase II grant consideration is 5:00 p.m. EST, July 31, 2014. Applicants should contact Alicia Barnett Collins at acollins@cicf.org or 317.634.2423 for additional information.</span></p><p>The $2 million 2014 Community Crime Prevention Grant Program (Phase I and II) supports community-based organizations that can demonstrate community impact. In June 2014, The Indianapolis Foundation awarded $159,000 in expedited grants to 16 local not-for-profits as Phase I of the 2014 Marion County-City of Indianapolis&rsquo; Community Crime Prevention Grant Program. The Indianapolis Foundation, a Central Indiana Community Foundation (CICF) affiliate, entered into a contract with the City of Indianapolis to manage the Community Crime Prevention Grant program at the request of the City-County Council in May, 2013.</p><p><strong>ABOUT PHASE II GRANTS:</strong><br />Phase II grants will range between $5,000 and $100,000; the application process begins July 1, 2014, and end at 5:00 p.m. EST, July 31, 2014. Phase II grants are one-year grants and will be awarded in the fall of 2014. Grant funds MUST be expended between October 1, 2014 and July 1, 2015. Organizations must be a 501 (c) (3) charitable organization or a public entity partnering with a 501 (c) (3) charitable organization as a fiscal agent in order to be eligible for grant consideration. Applications for Phase II will be available on July 1, 2014, at www.cicf.org. For additional information, contact Alicia Barnett Collins at acollins@cicf.org or 317.634.2423.</p><p>The Foundation will consider Phase II grant applications that clearly demonstrate an immediate intentionality around crime prevention and support programming that:</p><ul><li>Prevents violent crimes among residents</li><li>Provides prevention or intervention services to adults or youth facing unique challenges</li><li>Improves neighborhood safety</li><li>Partners with public agencies to help reduce or prevent crime in our community</li></ul><p><strong>ABOUT PHASE I GRANTS (Awarded June, 1, 2014):<br /></strong>The Phase I expedited allocation focused specifically on 2014 summertime job programs for youth as well as crime-deterrent programming for at-risk populations in designated high-crime areas. <br />The grant awards ranged between $5,000 and $20,000 and had to be expended by September 1, 2014. To qualify for grant consideration and receipt, organizations had to be either a 501 (c) (3) charitable organization or a public entity partnering with a 501 (c) (3) charitable organization as a fiscal agent in order to be eligible for grant consideration. For a complete list of grant recipients, please go <a href="http://www.cicf.org/files/file/The_Indianapolis_Foundation_Awards_Phase1_Community_Crime_Prevention_Grants_Grantee_List(1).pdf">here</a>.&nbsp;</p><p><strong>ABOUT THE COMMUNITY CRIME PREVENTION GRANT PROGRAM:</strong><br />In August 2006, the Community Crime Prevention Task Force was convened to study the root causes of crime in the community, determine the types of programs most likely to prevent crime or effectively intervene in the lives of those at risk of criminal behavior, and make recommendations about how the community could prevent crime in the future. The task force examined the underlying problems that led to a surge in violent crime in Indianapolis and in 2007 recommended actions to stem the violence and to prevent crime before it occurs. In July 2007, the City-County Council passed Proposal No. 264 to increase the County Option Income Tax (COIT) and establish the Community Crime Prevention Grant (CCPG) program to provide funding for crime prevention initiatives recommended by the Task Force its January 2007 final report.</p><p>In June 2012, the Community Crime Prevention Grant program awarded over $1.8M to 18 organizations that specifically provided support to youth programs and to programs that helped previously incarcerated individuals back in to jobs and back in to the community. At the request of the City-County Council, in April 2013, The Indianapolis Foundation, a Central Indiana Community Foundation (CICF) affiliate, entered into a contract with the City of Indianapolis to manage the $2 million Community Crime Prevention Grant program.</p><p>The Indianapolis Foundation Board of Trustees has agreed to serve as the fiscal agent and grant manager for the 2013 $2 million Community Crime Prevention Grant allocation, with resources going to support community-based organizations that can demonstrate community impact.&nbsp;Since being named the administrator of the Community Crime Prevention Grant Program in May, 2013, The Indianapolis Foundation has worked to create a process that is transparent and holistic in its approach of administering public resources to achieve the greatest public impact. This work included a &ldquo;listening tour&rdquo; of many of the city&rsquo;s non-profit organizations that provide related and/or associated crime prevention services. The Foundation will continue to solicit input from community leaders and residents to help develop strategies that address both the symptoms and root causes of crime in Indianapolis and Marion County.</p><p>For additional information, Community Crime Prevention Grant organizations are encouraged to visit www.cicf.org. For additional grant information, contact Alicia Barnett Collins at acollins@cicf.org or 317.634.2423.</p><p><strong>ABOUT THE INDIANAPOLIS FOUNDATION:</strong> Established in 1916, The Indianapolis Foundation was one of the first community trusts in America. The Foundation is a public charity and an affiliate of Central Indiana Community Foundation (CICF), a collaborative effort between the community foundations serving Marion and Hamilton Counties. As Indiana&rsquo;s oldest and largest community foundation, The Indianapolis Foundation was created to ensure that the quality of life in Marion County continuously improves; to help where the needs are greatest and the benefits to the community are most extensive; and to provide donors a vehicle for using their gifts in the best possible way now, and in the future as conditions in the community change. It awards approximately $7 million annually to support current and future community needs, and is governed by a board of six publicly-appointed trustees (Two are appointed by the Mayor of Indianapolis; two by the Marion County Circuit Court Judge; and two by the United States District Court presiding over Indianapolis).</p><p><strong>ABOUT CENTRAL INDIANA COMMUNITY FOUNDATION: </strong><br />Central Indiana Community Foundation (CICF) is a $700 million public charitable foundation transforming the lives of central Indiana residents in three ways: consulting donors, family foundations and their professional advisors on charitable giving; awarding grants to effective not-for-profit organizations; and providing leadership to seize opportunities and address community needs. CICF was established in 1997 as a partnership between The Indianapolis Foundation, serving Marion County since 1916, and Legacy Fund, serving Hamilton County since 1991. For more information about CICF, visit cicf.org, or contact Mike Knight at mikek@cicf.org.</p>http://www.cicf.org/cicf-news/2014/june/phase-ii-applications-for-community-crime-prevention-grants-now-availableWed, 31 Dec 1969 19:00:00 -0500The Indianapolis Foundation Awards More Than $2.2 Million to Support Community Needs<p>The Board of Directors of <a href="http://www.cicf.org/the-indianapolis-foundation">The Indianapolis Foundation</a>, an affiliate of Central Indiana Community Foundation, approved and awarded more than $2.2 million of grants to not-for-profits serving Marion County resident at a board meeting held on May 14, 2014. The grants included: responsive awards (requests for funding made by not-for-profits); support for The Indianapolis Public Library Foundation (which helps fund The Indianapolis Public Library) and investments into CICF&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.cicf.org/transform">Community Leadership Initiatives</a> (Family Success, Inspiring Places and College Readiness and Success).</p><p>Grants were made possible by donations made to the Foundation&rsquo;s Endowment for Indianapolis fund (an unrestricted fund whose grant allocations are recommended by CICF staff and approved by The Indianapolis Foundation Board of Directors). Community Leadership Initiatives support included $365,000 for The College Readiness and Success Investment Plan. The College Readiness and Success Initiative was created to increase educational attainment in central Indiana.</p><p>An additional $100,000 was awarded in support of the Inspiring Scholars Summer Learning Project, a pilot program designed to counteract summer vacation learning loss and instead accelerates learning during summer vacation. A grant of $500,000 was awarded for The Family Success Initiative Investment Plan. The Family Success Initiative was created to increase self-sufficiency in central Indiana families and individuals.</p><p>&ldquo;These grants represent The Indianapolis Foundation&rsquo;s mission to ensure that life in Marion County continuously improves for everyone,&rdquo; said Milton O. Thompson, Chair, The Indianapolis Foundation Board of Directors. &ldquo;They also represent the wishes of generations of donors and the love for the community we all share.&rdquo;<br />&nbsp;</p><table width="600" border="1" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1"><tbody><tr><td width="248" colspan="3" align="center" valign="bottom" bgcolor="#6699cc" height="20"><span style="font-size: 16px;"><strong>The Indianapolis Foundation May 2014 Responsive Grants<br type="_moz" /></strong></span></td></tr><tr><td width="248"><strong><span style="font-size: 14px;">Organization</span></strong></td><td width="248"><strong><span style="font-size: 14px;">Project</span></strong></td><td width="86" style="text-align: right;"><strong><span style="font-size: 14px;">Awarded</span></strong></td></tr><tr><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;">Center Township Re-Entry Program<br type="_moz" /></span></td><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;">Operation Fresh Start</span></td><td width="86" style="text-align: right;"><span style="font-size: 14px;">$20,000</span></td></tr><tr><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;">Child Advocates Inc.</span></td><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;">Youth Advocacy Project<span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre"> </span></span></td><td width="86" style="text-align: right;"><span style="font-size: 14px;">$25,000</span></td></tr><tr><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;">Edna Martin Christian Center</span></td><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;">Organizational Capacity Building</span></td><td width="86" style="text-align: right;"><span style="font-size: 14px;">$35,000</span></td></tr><tr><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;">Englishton Park United Presbyterian Ministries</span></td><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;">Englishton Park Academic Remediation Training Center</span></td><td width="86" style="text-align: right;"><span style="font-size: 14px;">$25,000</span></td></tr><tr><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;">Forest Manor</span></td><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;">Organizational Capacity Building and Operating Support</span></td><td width="86" style="text-align: right;"><span style="font-size: 14px;">$40,000</span></td></tr><tr><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;">Gleaners Food Bank of Indiana, Inc.</span></td><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;">BackSacks - Weekend Food for Kids Program</span></td><td width="86" style="text-align: right;"><span style="font-size: 14px;">$60,000</span></td></tr><tr><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;">Improving Kids' Environment</span></td><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;">Indiana Healthy Homes Alliance</span></td><td width="86" style="text-align: right;"><span style="font-size: 14px;">$20,000</span></td></tr><tr><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;">Indianapolis Jazz Foundation</span></td><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;">Remote Indy Jazz Fest Delivery</span></td><td width="86" style="text-align: right;"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space: pre;"> </span>$8,000</span></td></tr><tr><td width="248" style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: 14px;">Keep Indianapolis Beautiful, Inc.</span></td><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;">General Operating Support</span></td><td width="86" style="text-align: right;"><span style="font-size: 14px;">$35,000</span></td></tr><tr><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;">Noble of Indiana</span></td><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;">Noble Commercial Contract Services</span></td><td width="86" style="text-align: right;"><span style="font-size: 14px;">$75,000</span></td></tr><tr><td width="248" style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: 14px;">PACE, Inc.</span></td><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;">Transitional Services and Employment Programs</span></td><td width="86" style="text-align: right;"><span style="font-size: 14px;">$25,000</span></td></tr><tr><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;">People for Urban Progress</span></td><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;">Fabric and Resource Bank</span></td><td width="86" style="text-align: right;"><span style="font-size: 14px;">$30,000</span></td></tr><tr><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;">Riley Area Redevelopment Corporation</span></td><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;">Retail Incubator Pilot Project on Massachusetts Ave</span></td><td width="86" style="text-align: right;"><span style="font-size: 14px;">$16,000</span></td></tr><tr><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;">School on Wheels</span></td><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;">Operating Support</span></td><td width="86" style="text-align: right;"><span style="font-size: 14px;">$25,000</span></td></tr><tr><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;">Second Helpings</span></td><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;">Operating Support</span></td><td width="86" style="text-align: right;"><span style="font-size: 14px;">$60,000</span></td></tr><tr><td width="248" style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: 14px;">St. Joseph Institute for the Deaf - Indianapolis</span></td><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;">Early Intervention Program</span></td><td width="86" style="text-align: right;"><span style="font-size: 14px;">$18,000</span></td></tr><tr><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;">Teach Plus Incorporated</span></td><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;">Teach Plus Indianapolis</span></td><td width="86" style="text-align: right;"><span style="font-size: 14px;">$30,000</span></td></tr><tr><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;">The International Center</span></td><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;">The Festival Fund</span></td><td width="86" style="text-align: right;"><span style="font-size: 14px;">$28,000</span></td></tr><tr><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;">Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra</span></td><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;">Marketing Infrastructure</span></td><td width="86" style="text-align: right;"><span style="font-size: 14px;">$43,000</span></td></tr><tr><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><br type="_moz" /></span></td><td width="248" style="text-align: right;"><strong><span style="font-size: 14px;">Responsive Grants TOTAL:</span></strong></td><td width="86" style="text-align: right;"><strong><span style="font-size: 14px;">$575,000</span></strong></td></tr><tr><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><br type="_moz" /></span></td><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><br type="_moz" /></span></td><td width="86"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><br type="_moz" /></span></td></tr><tr><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><br type="_moz" /></span></td><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><br type="_moz" /></span></td><td width="86"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><br type="_moz" /></span></td></tr><tr><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><br type="_moz" /></span></td><td width="248"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><br type="_moz" /></span></td><td width="86"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><br type="_moz" /></span></td></tr></tbody></table><p>&nbsp;</p><hr /><p>ABOUT THE INDIANAPOLIS FOUNDATION: Established in 1916, The Indianapolis Foundation was one of the first community trusts in America. The Foundation is a public charity and an affiliate of Central Indiana Community Foundation (CICF), a collaborative effort between the community foundations serving Marion and Hamilton Counties. As Indiana&rsquo;s oldest and largest community foundation, The Indianapolis Foundation was created to ensure that the quality of life in Marion County continuously improves; to help where the needs are greatest and the benefits to the community are most extensive; and to provide donors a vehicle for using their gifts in the best possible way now, and in the future as conditions in the community change. It awards approximately $7 million annually to support current and future community needs, and is governed by a board of six publicly-appointed trustees (Two are appointed by the Mayor of Indianapolis; two by the Marion County Circuit Court Judge; and two by the United States District Court presiding over Indianapolis).</p><p>ABOUT CENTRAL INDIANA COMMUNITY FOUNDATION: <br />Central Indiana Community Foundation (CICF) is a $700+ million public foundation transforming the lives of central Indiana residents in three ways: consulting donors, family foundations and their professional advisors on charitable giving; awarding grants to effective not-for-profit organizations; and providing leadership to seize opportunities and address community needs. CICF was established in 1997 as a partnership between The Indianapolis Foundation, serving Marion County since 1916, and Legacy Fund, serving Hamilton County since 1991. For more information about CICF, visit cicf.org, or contact Mike Knight at <a href="javascript:void(location.href='mailto:'+String.fromCharCode(109,105,107,101,107,64,99,105,99,102,46,111,114,103)+'?subject=The%20Indianapolis%20foundation%20Awards%20More%20Than%20%242.2%20Million')">mikek@cicf.org</a>. <br />&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p>http://www.cicf.org/cicf-news/2014/june/the-indianapolis-foundation-awards-more-than-22-million-to-support-community-needsWed, 31 Dec 1969 19:00:00 -0500Legacy Fund Addresses Community Wide Needs Via May Grants<p>Legacy Fund of Hamilton County, an affiliate of the Central Indiana Community Foundation, awarded a total of $162,400 in grants as approved by Legacy Fund&rsquo;s Board of Directors at its May 12th, 2014 board of directors meeting.</p><p>The grant awards included $137,400 in grants made to 13 not-for-profits serving Hamilton County residents. The LINK Advisory Council, a youth-based philanthropic council created by Legacy Fund, also awarded $10,000 to three other not-for-profit organizations serving Hamilton County residents. An additional matching grant of $15,000 in partnership with the Hamilton County Convention and Visitors Bureau was made to help build capacity at county-based arts organizations (both organizations contributed $15,000 each to support the project).</p><p>The grants were made possible by Legacy Fund&rsquo;s Community Endowment Fund, and also The Sheridan Fund and the City of Noblesville Fund, which awarded city-specific grants. The Donald W. Johnson Fund for Shepherd&rsquo;s Center of Hamilton County, which addresses senior-focused issues, made an additional grant.</p><p><strong>(FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF GRANT ALLOCATION AND DISTRIBUTION PLEASE CLICK </strong><a href="/files/file/Legacy%20Fund%20May%202014%20Grants.pdf"><strong>HERE</strong></a><strong>.)</strong></p><p>The Legacy Fund Community Endowment Fund is an &ldquo;unrestricted&rdquo; fund created by donors with an interest in supporting Hamilton County. The City of Noblesville Fund was created to focus on Noblesville-specific issues. The Sheridan Fund was created by the Biddle Memorial Foundation and JBS United to address issues specific to the town of Sheridan. The Donald W. Johnson Fund for Shepherd&rsquo;s Center of Hamilton County was created in 2012 to better support the County&rsquo;s senior-needs. Grant allocations from the Community Endowment Fund are approved by Legacy Fund Board of Directors.</p><p>Created in 2002 by Legacy Fund to give Hamilton County youth an opportunity to be directly involved in their community and to inspire leadership in high school students through service, grantmaking and educational opportunities, The LINK Advisory Council made grants to support Second Helpings (a food rescue and re-use organization); Hamilton County East Public Library and Live the Way, Inc., which supports a community garden program in Noblesville.</p><p>&ldquo;These broad-based, community endowment funds demonstrate our donors&rsquo; commitment to Hamilton County,&rdquo; said Corby D. Thompson, board chair, Legacy Fund. &ldquo;They also demonstrate our donors&rsquo; faith in Legacy Fund&rsquo;s grants staff and board of directors&rsquo; ability to identify critical issues and needs, and then support effective not-for-profits that are addressing those needs.&rdquo;</p><p><strong>ABOUT LEGACY FUND: </strong><br />Legacy Fund, an affiliate of the Central Indiana Community Foundation (CICF), is a $50+ million public foundation that serves Hamilton County by administering charitable funds, foundations and organizational endowments for individuals, families and not-for-profit entities. Established in 1991, Legacy Fund&rsquo;s goal is to inspire philanthropy as it helps people enhance their family and charitable legacies in tax-smart ways. Legacy Fund has three main priorities: consult with donors, family foundations and professional advisors on charitable giving; award grants; and provide leadership to address community needs.</p><p><strong>ABOUT CENTRAL INDIANA COMMUNITY FOUNDATION: </strong><br />Central Indiana Community Foundation (CICF) is a $700+ million public foundation transforming the lives of central Indiana residents in three ways: consulting donors, family foundations and their professional advisors on charitable giving; awarding grants to effective not-for-profit organizations; and providing leadership to address community needs and seize opportunities. CICF was established in 1997 as a partnership between The Indianapolis Foundation, serving Marion County since 1916, and Legacy Fund, serving Hamilton County since 1991. For more information about CICF, visit cicf.org, or contact Mike Knight at mikek@cicf.org. <br />&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p>http://www.cicf.org/cicf-news/2014/june/legacy-fund-addresses-community-wide-issues-via-may-grantsWed, 31 Dec 1969 19:00:00 -0500The Indianapolis Foundation Awards $159,000 for Phase I of 2014 Community Crime Prevention Grants<p><a href="http://www.cicf.org/the-indianapolis-foundation">The Indianapolis Foundation</a>, an affiliate of Central Indiana Community Foundation, has awarded approximately $159,000 in expedited grants to sixteen local not-for-profits as Phase I of the 2014 Marion County-City of Indianapolis&rsquo; Community Crime Prevention Grant Program. The Phase I expedited allocation focuses specifically on 2014 summertime job programs for youth as well as crime-deterrent programming for at-risk populations in designated high-crime areas.</p><p>The grant awards range between $5,000 and $20,000 and must be expended by September 1, 2014. To qualify for grant consideration and receipt, organizations had to be either a 501 (c) (3) charitable organization or a public entity partnering with a 501 (c) (3) charitable organization as a fiscal agent in order to be eligible for grant consideration.</p><p>The $2 million 2014 <a href="http://www.cicf.org/community-crime-prevention-grant-funding-criteria">Community Crime Prevention Grant Program</a> (which includes Phase I and II) will again support community-based organizations that can demonstrate community impact.</p><p><strong>For a complete list of Phase 1 grant recipients, </strong><a href="/files/file/The_Indianapolis_Foundation_Awards_Phase1_Community_Crime_Prevention_Grants_Grantee_List(1).pdf"><strong>download the grantee list</strong></a><strong>.</strong></p><p>Phase II grants will range between $5,000 and $100,000; the application process begins July 1, 2014, and end at 5:00 p.m., July 31, 2014. Phase II grants are one-year grants and will be awarded in the fall of 2014. Organizations must be a 501 (c) (3) charitable organization or a public entity partnering with a 501 (c) (3) charitable organization as a fiscal agent in order to be eligible for grant consideration. Applications for Phase II will be available on July 1, 2014, at www.cicf.org. For additional information, contact Alicia Barnett Collins at <a href="javascript:void(location.href='mailto:'+String.fromCharCode(97,108,105,99,105,97,64,99,105,99,102,46,111,114,103)+'?subject=Community%20Crime%20Prevention%20Grants')">alicia@cicf.org</a> or 317.634.2423.</p><p>As in 2013, for Phase II, the Foundation will consider organizations that clearly demonstrate an immediate intentionality around crime prevention and support programming that:<br />&bull; Prevents violent crimes among residents<br />&bull; Provides prevention or intervention services to adults or youth facing unique challenges<br />&bull; Improves neighborhood safety <br />&bull; Partners with public agencies to help reduce or prevent crime in our community<br /> <br />&ldquo;The Indianapolis Foundation is honored to have this opportunity to help and support Indianapolis, and to join a community-wide effort to improve public safety by ensuring more of its citizens of all ages and circumstances have better access to productive, meaningful lives,&rdquo; said Brian Payne, President, The Indianapolis Foundation (and President and CEO, CICF). &ldquo;The Phase I fund distribution is meant to help more of our youth take productive steps while school is out, and to take the next steps toward a better, more successful future.&rdquo;</p><p>Applications for Phase II will be available on July 1, 2014, at www.cicf.org. For additional information, contact Alicia Barnett Collins at <a href="javascript:void(location.href='mailto:'+String.fromCharCode(97,108,105,99,105,97,64,99,105,99,102,46,111,114,103)+'?subject=Information%20request%20for%20Community%20Crime%20Prevention%20Grants')">alicia@cicf.org</a> or 317.634.2423.</p><p>The Indianapolis Foundation was selected to administer the Community Crime Prevention Program in 2013. Since its creation in 1916, The Indianapolis Foundation has awarded more than $200 million in grants to Marion County-based not-for-profits serving a broad range of people and addressing a wide variety of community needs. A high percentage of these grants have been directed at diverse populations and include support for: impoverished individuals and families working to achieve self-sufficiency; increased post-secondary education and vocational training attainment, specifically in low-income populations and; to help provide basic needs for economically disadvantaged families.</p><hr /><p>ABOUT THE COMMUNITY CRIME PREVENTION GRANT PROGRAM:<br />In August 2006, the Community Crime Prevention Task Force was convened to study the root causes of crime in the community, determine the types of programs most likely to prevent crime or effectively intervene in the lives of those at risk of criminal behavior, and make recommendations about how the community could prevent crime in the future. The task force examined the underlying problems that led to a surge in violent crime in Indianapolis and in 2007 recommended actions to stem the violence and to prevent crime before it occurs. In July 2007, the City-County Council passed Proposal No. 264 to increase the County Option Income Tax (COIT) and establish the Community Crime Prevention Grant (CCPG) program to provide funding for crime prevention initiatives recommended by the Task Force its January 2007 final report.</p><p>In June 2012, the Community Crime Prevention Grant program awarded over $1.8M to 18 organizations that specifically provided support to youth programs and to programs that helped previously incarcerated individuals back in to jobs and back in to the community. <br />At the request of the City-County Council, in April 2013, The Indianapolis Foundation, a Central Indiana Community Foundation (CICF) affiliate, entered into a contract with the City of Indianapolis to manage the $2 million Community Crime Prevention Grant program.</p><p>The Indianapolis Foundation Board of Trustees has agreed to serve as the fiscal agent and grant manager for the 2013 $2 million Community Crime Prevention Grant allocation, with resources going to support community-based organizations that can demonstrate community impact.<br />The Indianapolis Parks Foundation administered the previous Community Crime Prevention Grant Program, which ended as of May 31st, 2013. All previous Community Crime Prevention Grant recipients were invited to reapply for grants from July 1 to July 31, 2013.</p><p>The Indianapolis Foundation has worked since the culmination of the 2012 Community Crime Prevention Grant Program (May 31, 2013) to create a process that is transparent and holistic in its approach of administering public resources to achieve the greatest public impact. This work included a &ldquo;listening tour&rdquo; of many of the city&rsquo;s non-profit organizations that provide related and/or associated crime prevention services. The Foundation will continue to solicit input from community leaders and residents to help develop strategies that address both the symptoms and root causes of crime in Indianapolis and Marion County. For additional information, Community Crime Prevention Grant organizations are encouraged to visit www.cicf.org.</p><p>For additional grant information, contact Alicia Barnett Collins at <a href="javascript:void(location.href='mailto:'+String.fromCharCode(97,108,105,99,105,97,64,99,105,99,102,46,111,114,103)+'?subject=Information%20request%20regarding%20Community%20Crime%20Prevention%20Grants')">alicia@cicf.org</a>, or 317.634.2423.</p><p>ABOUT THE INDIANAPOLIS FOUNDATION: Established in 1916, The Indianapolis Foundation was one of the first community trusts in America. The Foundation is a public charity and an affiliate of Central Indiana Community Foundation (CICF), a collaborative effort between the community foundations serving Marion and Hamilton Counties. As Indiana&rsquo;s oldest and largest community foundation, The Indianapolis Foundation was created to ensure that the quality of life in Marion County continuously improves; to help where the needs are greatest and the benefits to the community are most extensive; and to provide donors a vehicle for using their gifts in the best possible way now, and in the future as conditions in the community change. It awards approximately $7 million annually to support current and future community needs, and is governed by a board of six publicly appointed trustees (Two are appointed by the Mayor of Indianapolis; two by the Marion County Circuit Court Judge; and two by the United States District Court presiding over Indianapolis).</p><p>ABOUT CENTRAL INDIANA COMMUNITY FOUNDATION: <br />Central Indiana Community Foundation (CICF) is a $700 million public foundation transforming the lives of central Indiana residents in three ways: consulting donors, family foundations and their professional advisors on charitable giving; awarding grants to effective not-for-profit organizations; and providing leadership to seize opportunities and address community needs. CICF was established in 1997 as a partnership between The Indianapolis Foundation, serving Marion County since 1916, and Legacy Fund, serving Hamilton County since 1991. For more information about CICF, visit cicf.org, or contact Mike Knight at <a href="javascript:void(location.href='mailto:'+String.fromCharCode(109,105,107,101,107,64,99,105,99,102,46,111,114,103)+'?subject=2014%20Community%20Crime%20Prevention%20Grant%20Phase%201')">mikek@cicf.org</a>.</p>http://www.cicf.org/cicf-news/2014/june/the-indianapolis-foundation-awards-165000-for-phase-i-of-2014-community-crime-prevention-grantsWed, 31 Dec 1969 19:00:00 -0500Is 2014 the Year of the Rebirth of the CRT?<p><img src="/files/image/brian.jpg" width="109" height="138" border="5" align="right" vspace="5" hspace="5" alt="" />The good news is that 2013 was a record year for stocks as the market posted its best gains since the go-go 90&rsquo;s, as the S&amp;P benchmark index rose 29.6% in 2013. But now that tax season has ended, many taxpayers are feeling the pain of paying taxes on the capital gains they realized in 2013 as the result of the five-year bull market.</p><p>It was been a while since taxpayers had capital gains. Many had built up capital gain loss carry forwards due to the Great Recession of 2007. Also, many taxpayers didn&rsquo;t realize there are now increased capital gain tax rates. The Affordable Care Act and American Taxpayer Relief Act (the &ldquo;Acts&rdquo;) added additional taxes on capital gains from 3.8% - 8.8% for many affluent taxpayers. Under the tax rates in the Acts, affluent taxpayers, when combined with Indiana State income taxes, can pay 28% or more in taxes on capital gains. This same tax rate was the Federal rate on capital gains back in the 1990&rsquo;s.</p><p>The American Taxpayer Relief Act has also eliminated, at least for now, the thought that the Federal Estate Tax will be repealed. Affluent taxpayers and their families, specifically those with estates greater than the exemption amounts of $10,680,000 if married, or $5,340,000 if single, now also have to pay Federal Estate Taxes at the rate of 40% on the amount of their estate that is greater than these stated exemption amounts.</p><p>For affluent taxpayers, the tax landscape of today is similar to the 1990&rsquo;s. During the 1990&rsquo;s, many taxpayers utilized a Charitable Remainder Trust Strategy to both give back to the charitable organizations that are meaningful and important to them and to reduce the tax impact of realizing capital gains.</p><p>Stocks aren't the only investments reaching record highs -- farmland has reached similar heights. Many owners of farmland want to maximize the income produced by their investments, and are considering selling those holdings. However, those who own farmland are hesitating to sell because of the capital gains taxes that would be due upon sale.</p><p>Whether it is the affluent taxpayer with a portfolio of highly appreciated stock or a concentrated equity position who wants to diversify, or an owner of farmland looking to holdings to increase income, it may be appropriate to dust off the Charitable Remainder Trust (&ldquo;CRT&rdquo;) and pull it out of the &ldquo;tool box&rdquo; of income tax and estate planning strategies.</p><p>Why? A CRT is a sensible option when clients:</p><ul><li>Have highly appreciated assets that they would like to diversify without paying capital gains tax. Examples include: highly appreciated portfolios, concentrated equity positions, privately owned stock prior to a public or private sale to a third party or an Employee Stock Ownership Plan, collectibles such as coin collections and antique car collections, commercial real estate, and farm land;</li><li>Want to increase their income to meet their wants or accomplish other advance estate planning strategies; and,</li><li>Want to benefit charitable beneficiaries instead of paying taxes on that investment.</li></ul><p>Six benefits for clients that implement the CRT strategy include:</p><ul><li>Receiving a current charitable income tax deduction for the present value of the remainder interest of the amount contributed to the CRT;</li><li>Paying no capital gains tax on the sale of the asset;</li><li>Potentially receiving more income after the transfer than the asset was earning before the transfer to the CRT;</li><li>Having the opportunity to combine the CRT strategy with creating an endowment fund at a community foundation;</li><li>Maintaining the ability to control most investments made by the CRT; and,</li><li>Receiving recognition, if clients desire, for generous gifts made to charity.</li></ul><p>Is 2014 the year of the rebirth of the Charitable Remainder Trust? With the tax and economic environment of today being similar to the 1990&rsquo;s, it just may be. Time will tell if clients once again look favorably to the Charitable Remainder Trust to accomplish their income and estate planning goals and objectives.</p><hr /><p><em>Brian A. Eagle, J.D. is a nationally known attorney, educator, author, and wealth strategy consultant. He frequently provides wealth strategies consulting services to business owners, affluent clients, professional colleagues, and nonprofit organizations. He is the managing attorney of the law firm, Eagle &amp; Fein, P.C. For more on Brian A. Eagle, J.D., and Eagle &amp; Fein, visit <a href="http://www.eagleandfein.com">www.eagleandfein.com</a>.</em></p>http://www.cicf.org/cicf-news/2014/may/is-2014-the-year-of-the-rebirth-of-the-crtWed, 31 Dec 1969 19:00:00 -0500Central Indiana Senior Fund Announces New Application Process<p>In early 2014, the Central Indiana Senior Fund completed a three-year strategic plan, including a review of funding priorities. Due to the length of time dedicated to the development and implementation of this process, in 2014, the Central Indiana Senior Fund has shifted to one grant application window: July 1 &ndash; July 31. Historically, the Central Indiana Senior Fund has accepted grant applications during two windows; February 1 &ndash; February 28 and July 1 &ndash; July 31.<br /> <br />One major change to the Central Indiana Senior Fund application format is that all grantseeking organizations must complete the <a href="/files/file/Central%20Indiana%20Senior%20Fund%20Proposal%20Concept%20Form.doc">2014 Central Indiana Senior Fund Proposal Concept Form</a> prior to May 31, 2014. Once your organization&rsquo;s Proposal Concept Form is received, you will be notified within two weeks as to whether or not your organization has been invited to continue on to the application stage of the Central Indiana Senior Fund grantmaking process. Central Indiana Senior Fund Advisors will convene in October to make funding decisions on those grant proposals.<br /> <br />Please find the <a href="/files/file/Central%20Indiana%20Senior%20Fund%20Proposal%20Concept%20Form.doc">2014 Central Indiana Senior Fund Proposal Concept Form</a>, complete it, and send it to Andrew Black at <a href="javascript:void(location.href='mailto:'+String.fromCharCode(97,110,100,114,101,119,98,64,99,105,99,102,46,111,114,103)+'?subject=2014%20Central%20Indiana%20Senior%20Fund%20Proposal%20Concept')">andrewb@cicf.org</a>, no later than midnight on May 31st.</p><p>Additionally, to learn if your organization may qualify for a grant, please review the <a href="/files/file/CISF%202014%20Grant%20Guidelines.pdf">2014 Central Indiana Senior Fund Grant Guidelines</a>. </p>http://www.cicf.org/cicf-news/2014/may/central-indiana-senior-fund-announces-new-application-processWed, 31 Dec 1969 19:00:00 -0500A Family's Legacy of Philanthropy: The Meyers<p>For the Meyers, preservation and people are family passions. Through the Robert R. and Gayle T. Meyer Family Fund, they devote their philanthropic energy and funds to advancing childhood education, ending domestic violence and ensuring the environment&rsquo;s future.</p> <p>Last fall, the Meyers supported the Central Indiana Land Trust's purchase of 69 acres of land off State Road 67 south of Mooresville. The acquisition is named the <a href="http://aroundindy.wordpress.com/2013/11/04/meyer-nature-preserve-opens-in-morgan-county-nov-5/">Fred and Dorothy Meyer Nature Preserve</a>, in honor of Robert's parents. Fred Meyer served on the board of the Indiana chapter of The Nature Conservancy and was instrumental in getting the state&rsquo;s first dedicated Nature Preserve established in 1969.</p> <p>Beginning with Fred and Dottie Meyer, enjoying and preserving nature has been a central family ethic. That focus has trickled down not only to their son, Robert, but also to their granddaughter, Molly Meyer. Molly devotes time in both her personal life, through the family fund, and in her professional work designing green roofs with <a href="http://www.rooftopgreenworks.com/">Rooftop Green Works</a>, including the rooftop at Indianapolis' NPR and PBS affiliate WFYI.</p> <p>&ldquo;Grandpa Fred and Grandma Dottie, they set things up on so many levels for us,&rdquo; says Molly. &ldquo;Just the spirit that they had for the outdoors and for adventure.&rdquo;</p> <p>Find out more about their adventures in giving, the natural world, and strategic action translate across the Meyer family generations in this video.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><iframe width="740" height="416" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/-l__BXLtx9k" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>http://www.cicf.org/cicf-news/2014/april/a-familys-legacy-of-philanthropy-the-meyersWed, 31 Dec 1969 19:00:00 -0500$2.4 Million in Grants to Benefit Nearly 50,000 Marion County Youth<p>The Summer Youth Program Fund, a funding collaborative of 10 local and national partners, will provide more than $2.4 million in grants to support programs at 157 organizations in Marion County. The grants will fund 189 low- or no-cost summertime programs, activities and experiences for nearly 50,000 area children ages 4 to 19-years old, and include sports, overnight camping, career exploration, youth employment, community service, college access and academic enrichment.</p><table width="275" cellspacing="5" cellpadding="5" border="0" align="right"><tbody><tr><td><img width="275" height="183" src="/files/image/IMG_0522 copy.jpg" alt="" /></td></tr><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><small><font class="blue ">Asante Children's Theatre is one of 157 organizations receiving support from the Summer Youth Program Fund. </font></small></td></tr></tbody></table><p>Founded in 1995 by The Indianapolis Foundation and Lilly Endowment Inc., the Summer Youth Program Fund was the first funding collaborative dedicated to summer youth programs in the United States. Since 1995, the collaborative has contributed more than $36 million dollars in general operating and capital support to Marion County organizations that provide summertime programming.</p><p>For 2013-2014, the funding partners are: Allen Whitehill Clowes Charitable Foundation, Inc.; Christel DeHaan Family Foundation; The Clowes Fund, Inc.; City of Indianapolis, DMD/HUD; Eli Lilly and Company; The Indianapolis Foundation; JPMorgan Chase Foundation; Kroger Central Division, Lilly Endowment, Inc.; Nina Mason Pulliam Charitable Trust.</p><p>&ldquo;The Summer Youth Program Fund demonstrates the power of collaboration along with a commitment to young people that&rsquo;s shared by businesses, government, not-for-profits and foundations alike,&rdquo; said Brian Payne, President and CEO of Central Indiana Community Foundation. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s a model of cooperation and support, and something our entire community should be proud of.&rdquo;</p><p>For a complete list of grantees, view the <a href="/files/file/2_4_million_In_Summer_Grants_To_Benefit_Marion_County_Youth.pdf">full release</a>. </p><hr /><p>ABOUT CENTRAL INDIANA COMMUNITY FOUNDATION: <br />Central Indiana Community Foundation (CICF) is a $694 million public foundation transforming the lives of central Indiana residents in three ways: consulting donors, family foundations and their professional advisors on charitable giving; awarding grants to effective not-for-profit organizations; and providing leadership to address community needs and seize opportunities. CICF was established in 1997 as a partnership between The Indianapolis Foundation, serving Marion County since 1916, and Legacy Fund, serving Hamilton County since 1991. For more information about CICF, visit cicf.org, or contact Mike Knight at <a href="javascript:void(location.href='mailto:'+String.fromCharCode(109,105,107,101,107,64,99,105,99,102,46,111,114,103)+'?subject=%242.4%20Million%20in%20Grants%20to%20Benefit%20Nearly%2050%2C000%20Marion%20County%20Youth')">mikek@cicf.org</a>.<br />&nbsp;</p>http://www.cicf.org/cicf-news/2014/april/24-million-in-grants-to-benefit-nearly-50000-marion-county-youthWed, 31 Dec 1969 19:00:00 -0500CICF Announces Lilly Endowment Community Scholarship Recipients<p>INDIANAPOLIS, IN &ndash; Thirteen students from Marion and Hamilton counties have been named recipients of four-year, full-tuition scholarships as the Central Indiana Community Foundation (CICF) 2014 Lilly Endowment Community Scholars.</p><p>A total of 99 central Indiana students were interviewed for the scholarships, which stipulated that recipients must: plan to pursue a fulltime baccalaureate course of study beginning in the fall of 2014 at a public or private college or university in Indiana; demonstrate an un-weighted GPA of at least 2.5 (3.0 for students in Hamilton County); demonstrate financial need; demonstrate leadership or initiative in their school or community; and promise to, upon graduation, give back to the community.</p><p>Thirty Hamilton County students were interviewed by the Hamilton County Lilly Endowment Community Scholarship Selection Committee for the scholarships following nominations by their school counselors. The following four were selected as scholarship recipients: Michael Boyer, Sheridan High School; Lucas Miller, Fishers High School; Stephen (Pete) Freeman, Noblesville High School; and Christopher White, Herron High School.</p><p>Sixty-nine Marion County students were interviewed by the Marion County Lilly Endowment Community Scholarship Selection Committee for the scholarships following nominations by their school counselors. The following nine were selected as as scholarship recipients: Keenan Rhodes, Park Tudor High School; Jesus Bazan, Lawrence Central High School; Maddison Schiller, Cardinal Ritter High School; Nupe Vinton, Franklin Central High School; Caleb Guerrero, Key Learning Community; Elsa Posada, Ben Davis University High School; Syretha Shirley, Pike High School; Ana Sainz, Cardinal Ritter High School; and Katie Thien, Lawrence North High School. Chastity Li of Ben Davis High School was originally awarded a scholarship but declined in order to accept an offer of admission to an out-of-state university.</p><p>Each nominee was nominated by his/her guidance counselor before being invited to complete an application and then interview through The Indianapolis Foundation, a CICF affiliate serving Marion County or Legacy Fund, a CICF affiliate serving Hamilton County. Any accredited high school could nominate up to two students in each county. Following the application and interview process, the finalists&rsquo; names were submitted to Independent Colleges of Indiana, Inc. (ICI) for final approval.</p><p>The scholarships are the result of a statewide Lilly Endowment initiative to help Hoosier students reach higher levels of education. Indiana ranks among the lowest states in the percentage of residents over the age of 25 with a bachelor&rsquo;s degree. A total of 143 scholarships were awarded statewide.</p><p><strong><span style="font-size: 13px;">ABOUT CENTRAL INDIANA COMMUNITY FOUNDATION:&nbsp;</span></strong><span style="font-size: 13px;"><br /></span>Central Indiana Community Foundation (CICF) is a $694 million public foundation transforming the lives of central Indiana residents in three ways: consulting donors, family foundations and their professional advisors on charitable giving; awarding grants to effective not-for-profit organizations; and providing leadership to address community needs and seize opportunities. CICF was established in 1997 as a partnership between The Indianapolis Foundation, serving Marion County since 1916, and Legacy Fund, serving Hamilton County since 1991. For more information about CICF, visit cicf.org, or contact Mike Knight at mikek@cicf.org.<br />&nbsp;</p>http://www.cicf.org/cicf-news/2014/april/cicf-announces-lilly-endowment-scholarship-recipientsWed, 31 Dec 1969 19:00:00 -0500