Community Crime Prevention Grant Program

The Community Crime Prevention Grant Program is funded from public resources allocated annually by Indianapolis-Marion County City-County Council and is administered by The Indianapolis Foundation, a CICF affiliate.

The Community Crime Prevention Grant program will work in alignment with the city’s Community-Based Violence Prevention Partnership Grant program to support evidence-based violence reduction programming and wraparound services. Learn more about the partnership. The Community Crime Prevention Grant Program will consider applications that received funding from the city’s Community-Based Violence Prevention Partnership BUT only for new and/or supportive programs.

Crime prevention is defined as

“any effort that seeks to reduce initial or chronic interaction with criminal and/or juvenile justice systems and increase the safety of Indianapolis residents and their neighborhoods by reducing risk factors (factors that increase the likelihood of engaging with juvenile or criminal justice system) or increasing protective factors (factors that decrease the impact of risk factors).”


Grant FundING Allocation

Longer-term crime prevention: $1.1 million will be available to organizations performing longer-term crime prevention activities, including activities relating to reentry.

Shorter-term crime prevention: $1.1 million will be available to organizations performing shorter-term crime prevention, crime reduction, and other community outreach activities.


Grant Funding Priorities

The 2020 Community Crime Prevention Grant Program will give priority (through an equity framework) to organizations that clearly demonstrate immediate intentionality around crime prevention and support programs using proven or promising strategies that:

  • focus on integrated, evidence-based outreach activities through discrete activities, active violence disruption and community canvassing/outreach that targets, engages and involves hard-to-reach populations connected to gun-violence related activities
  • provide intervention services to youth (16-24) and adults (24-30) currently interacting with the criminal justice system to community-based services to build the necessary infrastructure to prevent violent crimes in Indianapolis and capable of delivering measurable results in the areas of employment and job retention for the population(s) of focus
  • improve neighborhood safety within IMPD’s patrol districts through community mobilization efforts to reduce or prevent crime in a specific geographical area
  • partner with public agencies (The Office of Public Health & Safety, law enforcement, courts, probation and parole) to help or prevent crime in our community

Geographic Restriction: Marion County

Interest Areas: Violence Reduction, Intervention, Prevention, Public Safety Partnerships, and Neighborhood-Based Strategies (see explanation below)

Grant award range: $5,000-$200,000

Grant funds must be expended between Dec. 1, 2020, and Dec. 1, 2021.

Organizations that are start-ups and/or pilot programs may be considered for capacity building support.

Organizations must be a 501(c)(3) public charitable organization or a public entity partnering with a 501(c)(3) charitable organization as a fiscal agent.


2020 Community Crime Prevention Grant interest areas

VIOLENCE REDUCTION
Priority to programs/efforts that develop and implement integrated, evidence-based outreach activities/crisis intervention, violence interruption, cognitive behavioral therapy, family-based programming, or interventions similar to the Indianapolis Violence Reduction Partnership or the Cure Violence model; for those residents who are most at-risk of violent victimization and direct residents to community-based services to build the necessary infrastructure to prevent violent crime in Indianapolis, including:

  • provide outreach and other engagement strategies to identify individual needs and improve access to community organizations who deliver services for the population (s) of focus
  • provide direct services for the population (s) of focus that include an active, formal mentorship component with regular meetings (at least three to four times a month) of sufficient duration (six to twelve months).
  • provide case management or other affiliated strategies to enroll and retain participants in necessary services, and coordinate the delivery of services across service providers

INTERVENTION
These programs focus their efforts on providing supportive services to residents currently interacting with the criminal justice system. These services support productive citizenship, financial self-sufficiency and reduce recidivism. Organizations applying in this area should be able to demonstrate how efforts influence an individual’s ability to gain skills, obtain work, secure housing, and prevent interaction with the local criminal justice system after being convicted of a crime.

These efforts may include:

  • a focus on providing support services to delinquent youth to prevent interaction with the juvenile justice system, the adult criminal justice systems, or gangs
  • a focus on providing support services to adult offenders and ex-offenders to become economically self-sufficient, reintegrate into the local community and reduce recidivism

PREVENTION

These programs focus their efforts on providing supportive services (such as employment, education, mentoring, and family support services) to youth and adults who face unique challenges and may have a higher likelihood of community disengagement without the proper intervention strategies. Organizations applying in this area should be able to demonstrate the impact of services and the ability to improve current conditions of program participants. *A formal mentorship component should include regular meetings (at least three to four times a month) of sufficient duration (six to twelve months). Priorities for organizations that provide services to both youth and the parent/guardians.

This effort may include a focus to increase protective factors and develop resiliency skills of specifically targeted youth and adult populations, including:

  • Youth (12-22) who are: foster youth, struggling academically, suspended or expelled from school multiple times, truant, or known to be affiliated with gang activity
  • Opportunity Youth (16-24) who are: also known as disengaged youth; who are out of school, not enlisted and not working, often as a result of systematic barriers to jobs and education.
  • Adults (22 or older) who face unique social-economic or social-emotional challenges, e.g., chronic unemployment, suffering substance abuse and/or mental illness

NEIGHBORHOOD-BASED STRATEGIES

Place-based efforts designed to reduce or prevent crime in a specific geographical area as defined by a neighborhood and/or community. Organizations applying for support in this area must be able to measure how efforts have increased residents’ safety in a particular area through resident surveys, increase crime reporting, or by using crime statistics. These efforts may include:

  • a focus on engaging resident and community leaders to help reduce crime within specific neighborhoods, zip codes, or other geographical areas (i.e., crime watch)
  • a focus at building community partnerships with public systems (law enforcement, court systems, and corrections) within a specific geographical area to help reduce criminal activity, assisting with solving crimes, increase crime reporting or provide information to help prevent the occurrence of a crime
  • a focus to improve physical assets and spaces within a neighborhood that has the potential of improving resident safety and/or deterring criminal behavior and/or activity

GRANTEE REQUIREMENTS

All grantees are required to attend the following:

  • orientation
  • trainings
  • collaborative learning exchanges
  • events in respective IMPD districts

Youth-serving organizations must join and attend meetings for the Marion County Youth Violence Prevention Coalition (MCYVPC).

Organizations serving the reentry population must join and attend meetings for the Marion County Reentry Coalition (MCRC).

Additionally, all grantees must provide quarterly reports and attend a face to face mid-year check-in.

Failure to comply with these requirements may result in withholding of grant funds and impact consideration for future Community Crime Prevention Grant Program funding opportunities.


Community Crime Prevention Grant Program Timeline

Important date
action/ deadline
Aug. 14, 2020  Application window opens. Submit applications here
Sept. 15, 2020  Completed applications must be submitted by 12 noon
Nov. 30, 2020  Grantee notification
Dec. 1, 2020  Grant period begins
Dec. 15, 2020  Grantee orientation meeting
Jan. 1 – Dec. 1, 2021  Trainings, Convenings, Learning Exchanges for Grantees
Mar. 19, 2021 Progress Report Due
June 14-18, 2021 Mid-year grantee check-in
Sept. 17, 2021 Progress Report Due
Dec. 1, 2021 Grant cycle period ends
Dec. 31, 2021 Final grant reports due

What The Community Crime Prevention Grant Program Does Not Fund

  • organizations that are NOT tax-exempt under section 501(c)(3) Public Charity of the Internal Revenue Code
  • grants to individuals
  • projects aimed at promoting a particular religion or construction projects for religious institutions
  • operating, program and construction costs at schools, universities and private academies unless there is significant opportunity for community use or collaboration
  • organizations or projects that discriminate base upon race, ethnicity, age, gender or sexual orientation
  • political campaigns or direct lobbying efforts by 501(c)(3) organizations
  • post-events, after-the-fact situations or debt retirement
  • medical, scientific or academic research
  • publications, films, audiovisual and media materials, programs produced for artistic purposes or produced for resale
  • travel for bands, sports teams, classes and similar groups
  • annual appeals, galas or membership contributions
  • fundraising events such as golf tournaments, walk-a-thons and fashion shows

CRITERIA USED TO REVIEW APPLICATIONS

The CICF Equity Framework will provide the overarching filter in the grant review process in the foundation’s effort to promote and advance equity in our community. A reference to the CICF Equity Framework is here.

will not consider funding
hesitant to consider funding
will consider funding
Alignment with CICF’s mission and focus on opportunity, equity, and inclusion Proposed work does not align with the mission, has no focus on opportunity, equity, and inclusion, and does not address eliminating inequities and disparities. Proposed work mentions aspects of OEI, and eliminating inequities and disparities, but does not provide details on how this is implemented. Proposed work is in direct alignment with CICF’s mission, has a clear focus on opportunity, equity, and inclusion, and clearly addresses eliminating inequities and disparities.
Collaborative Approach

Demonstrate the ability to partner with other public agencies and/or not-for-profit organizations to support crime prevention and/or reduction efforts. Provide a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for each collaborating partner.

Critical project partner is missing from the project plans, or at least one collaborative partner’s contribution to the project is unclear. No MOUs provided. Proposal shows some indication of appropriate collaborative partners. Applicant has provided MOUs for some partners, but not all. Proposal includes a well-defined plan identifying appropriate collaborative partners, each of which add value to the program. Applicant has provided MOUs for all partners.
Statement of the problem and alignment with Crime Prevention Grant Priority

Address specific priority areas of the Community Crime Prevention Program (as outlined above)

Applicant does not adequately state the problem; no evidence-based justification for the project—little or no discussion of connection between proposed project and Crime Prevention Grant priorities. The applicant does not include a clear statement of work to be completed or make a compelling case. Discussion of connection between proposed project and Crime Prevention Grant priorities is vague or incomplete. The applicant fails to make a compelling case. Applicant clearly states the problem and provides a strong rationale for grant funding, clearly explaining activities and outcomes. There is a clear connection between the proposed project and Crime Prevention Grant priorities. The significance of the proposed activities is clear and well defined.
Program CapacityProject Design, and Implementation

Demonstrate the ability to achieve program outcomes that reduce risk factors and/or enhance protective factors

Project design is vague and not clearly linked to project goals. Project is not innovative. Organization does not demonstrate capacity to achieve program outcomes that reduce risk factors and/or enhance protective factors. Adequate project design with procedures and activities is defined, but project is unclear, lacks innovation, and is not clearly linked to project goals. Organization demonstrates little to moderate capacity to achieve program outcomes that reduce risk factors and/or enhance protective factors Strong and innovative project design with procedures and activities that are well defined, fully explained, and link to project goals. Organization demonstrates great capacity to achieve program outcomes that reduce risk factors and/or enhance protective factors
Data-Driven

Demonstrate the ability and/or a plan to collect program performance and impact data

Proposal does not include any methods to assess participants, evaluate the project, and does not incorporate feedback to improve programming. Proposal includes at least one method to assess participants or evaluate the project and has a good plan for data collection, receives feedback from program participants, but does not have a clear plan to incorporate it to inform program design and delivery. Proposal includes a solid data collection plan, and a variety of methods to assess participants, elevate and celebrate individual and community agency, benchmark success, challenges, and discoverable.

Data plan reflects continuous feedback and incorporation of information from community, stakeholders, and program participants to evaluate the project and inform program design and delivery.

Financial Management and budget

Demonstrate the ability to account for grant funding and leverage other financial and/or in-kind support from other community partnerships

Key expenses are neither described nor justified. The method for arriving at budgeted expense categories/ amounts is not provided. Some expenses are described and justified. The method for arriving at budgeted expense categories/amounts is unclear or requires inference. Key expenses are fully described and justified. The method for arriving at budgeted expense categories/amounts is clearly explained. Budget is directly connected to project description, goals, and timetable. Budget demonstrates commitment to money flowing to the hands of program participants and other residents that are asked to assist with program implementation.

 

In addition to these criteria, the grant review committee will also take into consideration:

  • governance
  • financial health
  • project concept
  • expected impact
  • sustainability

How to Apply

  • Access the online application. CICF requires all applicants to use our online grants management system.
  • Complete the organization profile
  • Complete the common application

RESOURCES FOR COMMUNITY CRIME PREVENTIONS GRANTS


About the Community Crime Prevention Grant Program

In August 2006, the Community Crime Prevention Task Force was convened to study the root causes of crime in the community, determine the types of programs most likely to prevent crime or effectively intervene in the lives of those at risk of criminal behavior, and make recommendations about how the community could prevent crime in the future. The task force examined the underlying problems that led to a surge in violent crime in Indianapolis and in 2007 recommended actions to stem the violence and to prevent crime before it occurs. In July 2007, the Indianapolis City-County Council passed Proposal No. 264 to increase the County Option Income Tax (COIT) and establish the Community Crime Prevention Grant (CCPG) program to provide funding for crime prevention initiatives recommended by the Task Force its January 2007 final report.

In June 2012, the Community Crime Prevention Grant program awarded over $1.8 million to 18 organizations that specifically provided support to youth programs and to programs that helped previously incarcerated individuals back in to jobs and back in to the community.

At the request of the City-County Council, in April 2013, The Indianapolis Foundation, a Central Indiana Community Foundation (CICF) affiliate, entered into a contract with the City of Indianapolis to manage the $2 million Community Crime Prevention Grant program.

The Indianapolis Foundation Board of Trustees has agreed to serve as the fiscal agent and grant manager for the 2013 $2 million Community Crime Prevention Grant allocation, with resources going to support community-based organizations that can demonstrate community impact.

The Indianapolis Parks Foundation administered the previous Community Crime Prevention Grant Program, which ended as of May 31st, 2013. All previous Community Crime Prevention Grant recipients were invited to reapply for grants from July 1 to July 31, 2013.

The Indianapolis Foundation has worked since the culmination of the 2012 Community Crime Prevention Grant Program (May 31, 2013) to create a process that is transparent and holistic in its approach of administering public resources to achieve the greatest public impact. This work included a “listening tour” of many of the city’s not-for-profit organizations that provide related and/or associated crime prevention services. The Foundation will continue to solicit input from community leaders and residents to help develop strategies that address both the symptoms and root causes of crime in Indianapolis and Marion County.